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Football Star Beau Orth’s Wrong Level Spine Surgery Ruined His Career

Beau Orth, a former University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) football player, had a promising football career ahead of him until he had wrong-level surgery on his spine — an operation that ended any chances of him ever playing again.

Beau Orth seemingly had a chance at a career playing football and was looking forward to playing professionally. He went in to surgery to treat a herniated disc, which consisted of a micro-discectomy at LS-S1. His doctor told him that surgery was simple and easy and would allow him to play in a few weeks. Orth, who was 21 years old at the time, came out of surgery to discover the surgeon, Dr. Albert Capanna, had operated on L4-5, not LS-S1.

The result was a severe collapse of his disc. His spine was permanently damaged and he would never play football again. He faces the prospect of multiple future surgeries to attempt to correct the damage left behind by Capanna. According to the statement of claim, Capanna had reportedly also conducted a wrong-level surgery on at least one other UNLV football player.

The medical malpractice lawsuit seeks damages and hopes to make a statement that this type of error should never happen to any other players or patients. Medical bills in a situation such as this are staggeringly high, and even though Orth may have earned money from his early football career, it would be difficult to pay off the bills, particularly since he will require several future surgeries.

The ongoing expenses, medications and rehabilitation are going to becostly. Orth may wish to consider applying for pre-settlement funding from a litigation funding company. It is a user-friendly process and an application may be filled out online or by calling the lawsuit loan company directly.

Once the details of the case have been reviewed with the attorney-of-record and the application has been approved, the funds are expedited to the plaintiff, landing directly in his or her bank account in less than 48 hours. Applicants for pre-settlement funding are not required to be working when they apply, are not expected to go through a credit check and do not pay any funds upfront or throughout the duration of the lawsuit loan. They also do not have to deal with any insurance companies seeking to mitigate their losses by trying to get the plaintiff to settle for less than what they may get in court or on settlement.

Daren Monroe writes for Litigation Funding Corp. To learn more about lawsuit funding, visit

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